WillyWonkaWeinhaus
Wilson Gonzalez //
Actor/Musician //
I'm a modern prostitute who's getting paid for waiting //
Disneyprincess //
Berlin, Germany //
WillyWonkaWeinhaus
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I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)

I can hold my breath for a long, long time!Creepshow (1982)
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gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
gasoline-station:

H House
by BANG by MIN
via
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arqsa:

redzenradish:

redzenradish.tumblr.com

Keys and Shadows



(via TumbleOn)





(via TumbleOn)
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arqsa:

Pienzaby Martin Rak
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arqsa:

Architecture in Maastrichtby Stefan Kierek
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"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)

"The poor and the underclass are growing. Racial justice and human rights are non-existent. They have created a repressive society and we are their unwitting accomplices." - They Live (1988)
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arqsa:

photoshamanism:

The urban aberration
by Katharina Rhein
… many thanks to the dark silence in suburbia





(via TumbleOn)
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arqsa:

AS_20131110_040 by André Steenbergen on Flickr.
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cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
cinephilearchive:

In this undated interview, legendary Italian-born American director Frank Capra recalls his remarkable career. He talks candidly about his time at the studios on Gower Street, his relationship with Columbia boss Harry Cohn and the inner workings of the ‘studio system.’ He also recalls his films, including ‘It Happened One Night’ (1934) and ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ (1946), and reflects on some of the actors and actresses whose names he put in lights.

In 1983, Mike Thomas was running the San Diego Film Society and invited Frank Capra, along with his long-time cameraman, (and inventor of the zoom lens) Joseph Walker, to San Diego for a lecture and a screening of ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’ The city where he had met his wife Lucille while shooting a picture fifty years earlier held happy memories for the still vital 86 year old and during the limousine ride through the winding mountains from his La Quinta residence he reflected on his remarkable life in this never before published interview.

What does it take to be a director?The ability to make quick decisions. Everybody’s asking you questions, ‘Where do I put this?,’  ‘How do I play this scene?’ Problems have to be solved and you have to be able to solve them immediately. If I take a penny and toss it, I’ll be right in predicting it 50% of the time. In show business, if you’re right 50% of the time, you’re ahead of the game. It doesn’t matter if you’re not right all the time but you’ve got to make those snap decisions, fast! It’s got to be intuitive.

One of the best interviews I read in a while.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//
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psychedelic-psychiatrist:

oh